Announcing: Blog On – Completely Rewritten for Spring 2018 (Here’s Why)

Blog On is currently open for registration: the first module begins on Monday 28th May. Registration closes at the end of this Thursday (24th May), so if you’re interested, do check it out as soon as you can!

Blog On (Spring 2018) – get all the details here


One of the reasons I closed Writers’ Huddle at the end of April was so that I could run more online courses – and Blog On has been the most frequently requested one.

In fact, when I ran a survey recently, it was the most popular option for “which course shall I run next?” … narrowly beating Launch Your Freelancing Career, as you can see here:

I first ran Blog On way back in 2011 (which feels like a lifetime ago now I have a five year old and a three year old…) and I’ve run it several time since, updating it each time.

For 2018, though, I wanted to overhaul the whole course completely.

Last time we ran through Blog On, I had some great feedback from members who were enjoying the course but who felt that their blogs didn’t quite “fit” with the materials and assignments. They were blogging as a hobby, for writing practice, or to grow a platform for their fiction … and I’d originally designed Blog On with money-making bloggers in mind.

This time round, I’ve recreated Blog On from the ground up – ditching some modules completely and rewriting others pretty much from scratch.

I’ve aimed to keep all the things that Blog On members have enjoyed over the years, with step by step guidance on how to craft posts and pages for your blog … but I’ve also broadened out the remit of the course so that all bloggers can enjoy it.

While I might well raise the price for future iterations of the course, I’ve also kept the current price to just $39.99 (less than $5/week).

Whatever sort of blogging you do (or hope to do!), Blog On could be just what you need to get moving again.

Continue reading »

Five Easy Ways to Write in a More Conversational Style

If you’re a blogger, you’ve probably been told at some point that you should “write in a conversational style.”

It’s common advice – for some book authors, not just for bloggers. When I wrote Publishing E-Books for Dummies, Wiley wanted a conversational style too.

Real life conversations, though, have a lot of features that don’t seem to support good writing. In a conversation with friends, you might:

  • Jump around between different topics
  • Take a while to get to the point
  • Use in-jokes (where an outsider wouldn’t get the joke)
  • Use ungrammatical constructions – e.g. “Him and me went to the shops…” rather than “He and I went to the shops…”

A disjointed, rambling blog post full of references that no-one will understand and written with non-standard grammar isn’t going to be a great post.

So what do bloggers, editors and publishers mean when they ask for a “conversational style”?

They’re looking for writing that has the flavour of a real conversation without attempting to replicate it. In particular, they’re looking for writing that’s not too formal, that addresses the reader directly, that shows a light sense of humour, and that’s written in a way that’s easy to engage with.

I’m going to take you through some key ways to write in a conversational style … with concrete examples of how you can achieve each one.

Continue reading »

Three Different Ways to Approach Blogging as a Novelist [With Examples]

If you’re a novelist, should you have a blog?

Opinions differ! You might have been told that you should blog, because you need to build a platform, or because it’s a good way to get people onto your site and then onto your mailing list, or because publishers / readers / the media will want it … or for almost any number of reasons.

My take on it is this: You don’t need to blog. It might well be helpful to have a blog, but it might also end up taking time that could be better spent on other novel-marketing activities.

If you do decide to blog, there are a few different ways in which you might approach it. Here are three quite different examples from three different authors:

Continue reading »

2017 Roundup: Did You Miss Any of These Aliventures Posts?

I’m going to be taking some time off over the Christmas and New Year period – so I won’t be blogging again until mid-January.

In the meantime, if you want a bit of holiday reading, here are some posts from 2017 you might like to catch up with … or re-read. (And if this isn’t enough for you, don’t forget that you can find all past posts here in the Archive.)

Continue reading »

Has Your Blogging Gone as Well as You’d Hoped in 2017? Announcing Blog On

How’s 2017 been for you?

It’s been a mixed year for me: in some ways, I accomplished a lot more than I was expecting (I wrote a whole novella that I hadn’t even thought of back in January) … but inevitably, some of the projects I’d planned to do didn’t quite work out.

For the first year in a while, though, I’ve managed to keep up with weekly blog posts – and it’s been great to be back in the rhythm of writing regularly here on Aiventures.

I know that it can be very easy to lose momentum with a blog, though (I’ve definitely had my share of less than great years).

If your blogging hasn’t gone quite how you’d hoped over the past ten and a bit months, there’s still time to turn it around before the new year.

Announcing … Blog On

Blog On is an eight-week ecourse designed to help you write great posts for your blog, and get to grips with key pages, step by step. If you sometimes feel a bit overwhelmed by blogging, or find yourself procrastinating, this is the course for you!

I’ve been running Blog On, in various incarnations, since 2011 and I rewrote the whole course last year, for my Writers’ Huddle members.

Quite a few people have told me, though, that they’d like to take Blog On without having to have membership of Writers’ Huddle.

I completely understand that. I love the Huddle and the people in it, but I know a monthly membership site isn’t the right option for everyone.

So, for the first time in several years, I’m opening up Blog On to the general public. You don’t need to purchase a Writers’ Huddle membership to join – you can just buy the course itself.

You can get all the details (and join Blog On) here.

Note: If you’re a member of Writers’ Huddle, Blog On is half-price (or free for alumni members): just drop me an email at ali@aliventures.com if you want more information or need any help signing up.

If you’re not a member of Writers’ Huddle but would like to join and take part in Blog On … you can do that! 🙂 Just head over to the Blog On page for full details.

About Writers’ Huddle

Writers’ Huddle is my membership/community site for writers, and it’s been running since early 2012. Members pay a small monthly fee ($9.99 / £7.49) and get monthly seminars, weekly chats, private forums, mini-courses, and lots more … including the full archive of 60+ seminars.

In Writers’ Huddle, we cover blogging, along with a lot of other areas of writing: fiction, non-fiction, freelancing, self-publishing and more. So if you only blog, then it’s probably not a good fit for you. If you’re a blogger and an aspiring novelist, though, or a freelancing blogger, or a blogger who hopes to write a non-fiction book … check it out. You can find out all about it on the Writers’ Huddle home page (opens in a new tab so you don’t lose your place here).

What Could You Achieve With Your Blog in 2018?

Whether you’ve only just set up your first blog or you’ve been blogging for a few years without seeing the results you want, Blog On could be just what you need in order to get your blog into great shape for 2018.

You might want to make money from your blog, launch a freelancing career, build up a great portfolio of your writing, establish a strong readership base, or simply build a regular writing habit: whatever your goals, Blog On can help you.

There’s a full money-back guarantee, too: if the course isn’t for you, just email me before the end of the final week and I’ll be glad to refund you in full. I want you to be able to try out the whole course with confidence.

As well as the ecourse materials, you’ll have access to the Blog On members’ forum, where you can post any questions you have (whether they’re related to the course materials or not) – and where you can ask for feedback on anything you’ve written.

I’ve taken quite a few ecourses myself in the past, and I know how easy it is to start with enthusiasm … only to drop out after a week or two. To keep you on track with Blog On, I’ll be sending out email reminders each Monday and Thursday, and running a weekly prize draw for everyone who “checks in” on the forums. At the end of the eight weeks, I want you to have a blog that you can be justifiably proud of. J

If you think Blog On might be for you, just head here to get all the details.

Got any questions? You’re very welcome to pop a comment below, or if you’d like to contact me privately, just email ali@aliventures.com and I’ll be glad to help.

Should Your Blog Have a Narrow or Broad Topic?

blog-niche

Back when I got into blogging, in 2007, new bloggers were often told to choose a “niche”. If you wanted to be successful – so the thinking went – you needed to have a very specific topic, to differentiate yourself from all the other blogs out there.

Today, there are obviously even more blogs (not to mention podcasts, twitter chats, Facebook groups…) competing for attention.

Some bloggers still feel that, to succeed, they need to have a really unique topic or a very narrow niche, like “iPhone covers for the over 60s”.

But I think the “niche” advice is outdated … and I’m not sure it was ever quite right in the first place.

Many blogs – including many very popular blogs! – cover relatively broad topics. Write to Done, for instance, has advice on all sorts of aspects of writing – covering fiction, freelancing and blogging. Michael Hyatt’s blog centres on leadership, but takes in a huge number of diverse topics, from blogging and platform-building to hiring and managing a strong team.

So do you really need a niche? And if you do … how narrow should that niche be?

Let’s take a look first at why the “niche” advice became so popular in the first place.


Why Going TOO Broad Can Be a Problem

In the very early days of blogging, most blogs were essentially personal journals. Their “topic”, as such, was the blogger’s life and interests. There are still plenty of these blogs around (I like Richard Bartle’s) and they certainly still have their place.

However, if you want to get a large audience for your blog, you probably need to narrow your focus a little more than “everything I’m interested in”. (You might get away with it, though, if you’re an outstandingly good writer, or you have a particularly exciting and unusual life.)

If you’re struggling to see why blogging about anything and everything is a problem, look at it this way: most people will, inevitably, not share all your interests. They may well drift away if they’re only interested in, say, one out of every ten of your posts.

Here on Aliventures, I blog about writing. I occasionally mention other aspects of my life – like my two small children – but I don’t blog about, say, raising kids, or cooking, or great books I’ve read, or stuff to do around Leeds (where I live) or any of the other things going on in my life!

Why Too Narrow a Niche Won’t Work Either

When you pick a topic for your blog, though, you don’t want to rein yourself in too tightly. You want some room to develop and grow your ideas, without being tied into a very rigid and specific topic.

For instance, if you chose to blog only about “writing dialogue”, you’d probably find that you ran out of ideas and resources after a few weeks or months. Your blog might well become the go-to place for people wanting to craft better dialogue – and you could have a fairly static website designed to support, say, a book or course on the subject – but you’d be unlikely to want to write about dialogue every week for several years.

When you launch your blog and choose what to call it, you’ll also choose a domain name. (For help with that, check out my post Three Different Ways to Name Your Blog or Website.) If your name is too restrictive, it can make it difficult to change direction: writingdialogueforyournovel.com, for instance, is very specific, whereas something a little more general like talkingheads.com gives a bit more scope.

Finding a Middle Ground

A good blog topic, then, is one that’s clear and defined but that gives you some breathing and growing room.

And while on the surface of it, your topic might seem like the main thing that distinguishes you from other blogs, there are actually plenty of other ways to stand out:

  • With the “angle” you bring to your topic – e.g. The Write Life covers general writing advice but with a focus on freelancing and making a living.
  • With your voice or style – e.g. Naomi from IttyBiz very much built her blog on this, plus her specific audience focus on tiny businesses.
  • With the type of posts you publish – e.g. Smart Blogger have very long posts that go into lots of depth; Seth Godin is known for short, pithy but insightful posts.

 

If you’ve been blogging for a while about several quite different topics, you might want to survey your readers to find out what topics they’re most interested in (you could also look at which posts are performing best in Google Analytics).

 

There’s no “right” answer when it comes to blogging, and of course you should feel free to write about whatever you want – whether that’s one very narrow topic or several very broad ones! Keep in mind, though, that if you want your blog to gain readers, to make money, and/or to raise your profile in your field, you’ll do best if you focus on a clear topic that gives you – and your readers – room to grow.

If you’d like a bit more help with your blogging, do check out my free ebooks Ten Powerful Ways to Make Your Blog Posts Stronger and Ten Easy Ways to Attract Readers to Your Blog … And Keep Them There. They’re quick to read, packed with tips you can put into practice right away, and completely free – you can find out more and sign up for them here.

Three Different Ways to Name Your Blog or Website [Pros and Cons]

name-blog-website

If you’ve ever thought about starting a blog – or a website of any sort – you’ve probably run up against a pretty obvious problem.

It needs a name!

Choosing what to call your blog tends to be wrapped up in a whole host of other problems – like knowing what topics you want to write about and what sort of tone you want to use.

I’ve got stuck, plenty of times, at the naming stage: sometimes, it’s meant delaying projects for months because I just can’t figure out what to call the website.

In this post, I’ll run through the three different options you have, and explain why (or why not) you might want to go for each.

Note: This post is based on material from the Blog On ecourse in Writers’ Huddle – if you’re a member of Writers’ Huddle, do check out the rest of Blog On Module #1 for help with coming up with ideas for your blog. If you’re not a member, you can join the waiting list (and get some exclusive goodies) here.

Continue reading »

Seven Great Sources of New Ideas for Your Blog

light-bulbs-branded

Do you ever struggle to come up with ideas for your blog?

I think all bloggers do, at some point. Sadly, this is one common reason why blogs get abandoned: the blogger couldn’t think what to write about, and days went by, then weeks, with no new posts … before they eventually gave up altogether.

The great news is that there are tons of ideas all around you, just waiting to be written.

And don’t worry about ideas having already been “taken” by other bloggers. What matters is not having a totally new, never-before-seen idea – but having a solid idea that you can bring your unique perspective and skills to.

Here are seven of my favourite ways to come up with blogging inspiration:

Continue reading »

Seven Ways to Start a Blog Post … and Seven Ways to Finish It

seven-ways

Where do you get typically get stuck when you’re writing a blog post?

For a lot of bloggers, the first few lines of the post – and the last few – are really tough. You might have a perfectly good plan for what’s going to come later … but you just don’t know how to begin.

One solution is to simply type anything to get you going. While that’s fine when you’re drafting, at some point, you’re going to need to come back and revise.

Another is to skip the introduction and jump straight in with your first key point. Again, that’s a great way to get moving … but it doesn’t really solve the problem. You’re still going to have to write that introduction at some point.

Beginnings and endings matter, and it’s important to get them right.

The first few lines of your post draw the reader in and, ideally, set the tone for what’s to come.

The final few lines are a crucial opportunity to ensure your post makes a difference.

Here, I’ll go through seven different ways to start a blog post, and seven ways to finish it – with examples from a bunch of blogs.

Note: You can use more than one “start” or “finish” technique in a single post (as you read through, you’ll probably spot that some of the examples do this). To begin with, though, you might want to focus on just one at a time.

Continue reading »

How to Blog Consistently and Build Your Audience: Eight Simple Steps

I’ve got a confession to make.

I had five different blogs before Aliventures that I started, worked on for a while, then abandoned. (One got ditched after two weeks; my best attempt lasted a year and a half.)

With all those blogs, I made the right call. They weren’t on topics that interested me enough to stick with them for good. They weren’t “me”.

It definitely didn’t help, though, that as I lost interest, I barely posted at all.

However much you love your blog’s topic, you’re not going to get far if you don’t blog consistently.

If you don’t publish posts regularly, you’ll find that:

  • You get out of the habit of writing for your blog, and feel a lot of resistance towards getting going again.
  • You lose any momentum you’ve built up – your readership and traffic levels may not drop dramatically, but they’re certainly not growing.
  • You feel discouraged, and eventually, give up on your blog. That might be a deliberate decision to stop blogging, but more often, it just happens. You don’t blog for a few weeks … then a few months … and eventually you realise you stopped years ago.

Of course, the easy answer here is to just blog regularly – every week, or twice a week, or three times a week – without fail.

But it isn’t really as easy as that.

Life gets in the way, for one thing – even the lovely bits of life. In the past six years of blogging on Aliventures, I’ve had two house moves, a wedding, two pregnancies, two babies … none of which have exactly been conductive to the smooth running of the blog.

And for many bloggers, writing itself is hard at times. Perhaps you struggle to stay motivated, or you never seem to have any ideas. Even when life is going reasonably smoothly, it can be incredibly hard to stick with your blog, week in, week out.

But …

It’s possible.

One of the key things that helps me is to have a clear blogging workflow. In the past – particularly pre-kids – I just wrote posts on the days when I wanted to publish them. That works well for some bloggers, but for me, it became all too easy to let busyness take over.

These days, I have a system – which I’ll share in a moment. Before I get to it, though, a couple of important notes:

#1: While you’re working through this plan, it’s okay to hit “pause” on your blog. Don’t worry about publishing new content until you’ve got well ahead with ideas and plans. If you leap back in too soon, you’ll just end up back at square one.

#2: Feel free to tweak this plan to suit you. I’d definitely recommend giving it a go as-is to begin with, but if there’s something that isn’t quite right for you or your preferred way of working, feel free to improve on it! You might want to leave a comment below to let us know what you’ll be changing, in case your tweak would work well for someone else reading.

Continue reading »